Directed Studies

The Department of Philosophy offers two types of directed studies (DST) courses for undergraduate students: Directed Reading and Student Directed Seminars. No more than 6 credits of directed studies may be counted toward an undergraduate degree in Philosophy.

Directed Reading

A Directed Reading course is a general reading and/or research undertaking, completed under the supervision of a faculty member selected by the student. In consultation with the supervising faculty member, students are responsible for designing a course syllabus and submitting an application form to the Department of Philosophy prior to the beginning of the term in which the course will be offered.*

Applications forms can be submitted at the Philosophy main office (BUCH E370) or emailed to phil.undergrad@ubc.ca. Faculty members should supervise at most one Directed Reading per term.

Download the undergraduate directed reading application form here.

Student Directed Seminars

A Student Directed Seminar is a collaborative, student-led seminar on a topic not currently offered at UBC. It is initiated by an upper-year undergraduate student coordinator with a faculty sponsor. Students may earn academic credit as a participant in one Student Directed Seminar. Additionally, they may earn credit as a coordinator for one Student Directed Seminar. The minimum enrolment for a Student Directed Seminar is 8 students, while the maximum enrolment is 15.

To be considered for Philosophy credit, a Student Directed Seminar syllabus must be submitted to the Department of Philosophy by March 1st prior to the Winter Session in which the course will be offered.* Syllabi can be submitted at the Philosophy main office (BUCH E370) or emailed to phil.undergrad@ubc.ca.

A separate application must be submitted to the Student Directed Seminar Program in the Centre for Student Involvement & Careers. For more information, please visit their website at http://studentdirectedseminars.ubc.ca/.
 
*Please note that this policy will take effect September 2014.