Christina Hendricks

Selected Publications
    • “Prophecy and Parrêsia: Foucauldian Critique and the Political Role of Intellectuals” in Conceptions of Critique in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, ed. Ruth Sonderegger and Karin de Boer, Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012
    • “Foucault’s Kantian Critique: Philosophy and the Present”, Philosophy and Social Criticism Vol. 34, No. 4 (May 2008): 357-382. A pre-publication version of this paper can be found here: Hendricks-FoucaultKantCritique-WebVersion.pdf
    • “Commitment and Suspicion in Critical Thinking as Transcendence”, Philosophy of Education Yearbook (2006): 295-302. A PDF version of this article is available at The Philosophy of Education Yearbook archives.
    • “The Author[‘s] Remains: Foucault and the Demise of the ‘Author-Function’”, Philosophy Today Vol. 46, No. 2 (2002): 152-169

 

Research Interests    

After focusing in graduate school on evaluating the views of Julia Kristeva and Michel Foucault on the political role of intellectuals, I have so far done most of my research on the work of Michel Foucault, largely in the area of the political role of intellectuals. I have also studied Foucault’s lectures at the Collège de France, especially those from 1980-1984, where he engages in a historical analysis of the relationships between philosophical practice, truth-telling (parrhesia), and personal, social, and political transformation. I plan to write more about parrhesia in the near future.

Of late, however, I have focused my research more on the area of teaching and learning, and especially on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). I have been working to make my teaching more scholarly (basing my practice in data from the literature on teaching and learning as much as possible), and am planning some research projects of my own to collect data and contribute to the literature myself. I am particularly interested in research on learning communities (Arts One is an example of a learning community), how to help students improve their writing (including how best to organize and implement peer feedback activities, what sort of feedback from the professor tends to be most effective, how to ensure that that feedback is actually used in later work, and the efficacy of scaffolding writing assignments), and possible causes and remedies for the gender imbalance in philosophy in North America (and possibly elsewhere…I just am not as familiar with elsewhere).

I try to do posts on various scholarly articles on these and other topics in my blog on teaching philosophy, You’re the Teacher. When I’m teaching, my blogging rate goes way down, but during breaks between terms I try to keep up with posting regularly.

Recent and Upcoming Presentations
  • Co-presenter, with Sunaina Assanand, Joanne Fox, Catherine Rawn and Allen Sens, “Taking Your Teaching Beyond Your Classroom: Teaching Practice and Educational Leadership,” a panel presentation and discussion on educational leadership. Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 2015 conference, Vancouver, BC, June 2015
  • Co-presenter, with Rajiv Jhangiani, “Enhancing pedagogy with open textbooks and other open educational resources,” a presentation and discussion about the pedagogical value of using and creating open educational resources. Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 2015 conference, Vancouver, BC, June 2015.
  • Co-presenter, with Will Engle, Cindy Underhill and Lucas Wright, “The Medium and The Message: cMOOC as Open Professional Development,” about an open, online course we are running in June 2015 on Teaching with Word Press: http://blogs.ubc.ca/teachwordpress
  • Co-presenter, with Rajiv Jhangiani and Jessie Key, “Faculty Attitudes Towards and Experiences With OER and Open Textbooks,” presentation on the results of a survey of faculty in BC and beyond. BCcampus Open Textbook Summit, Vancouver, BC, May 2015
  • “Tracking a Dose-Response Curve in Peer Feedback on Writing: A Work in Progress.” BCcampus Symposium on Scholarly Inquiry into Teaching and Learning, Vancouver, BC, November, 2014. Slides from this presentation can be found here: http://www.slideshare.net/clhendricksbc/bc-campus-sotlsymposiumnov2014
  • “Doing Philosophy in the Open: Why/Not?”, a presentation on open education–what it is, benefits and drawbacks–at the biannual meeting of the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, Collegeville, Minnesota, July 2014. Slides from this presentation can be found here: http://blogs.ubc.ca/chendricks/2014/08/08/open-ed-aapt/
  • “Difficulties Evaluating connectivist MOOCs: Negotiating Autonomy and Participation,” presented at the annual Open Education Conference, Park City, Utah, November 2013. A videorecording of this presentation can be found on my blog: http: //blogs.ubc.ca/chendricks/2013/11/08/open-ed-2013/ The slides from this presentation can be found here: http://www.slideshare.net/clhendricksbc/difficulties-evaluating-cmoocs-open-education-c
  • “Prophecy and Parrêsia: Foucauldian Critique and the Political Role of Intellectuals” in Conceptions of Critique in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, ed. Ruth Sonderegger and Karin de Boer, Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012