Alison Wylie

Professor | Canada Research Chair | Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities
phone 604 822 6574
location_on Buchanan E 276
file_download Download CV

Research Area

Education

Ph.D. Philosophy Binghamton University 1982
B.A. Philosophy & Sociology, Mount Allison University 1976

Research

My areas of specialization are philosophy of the social and historical sciences; feminist philosophy of science; history and philosophy of archaeology; ethics issues in the social sciences.

Most fundamentally I’m curious about how inquiry succeeds under non-ideal conditions, and how we can best adjudicate the knowledge claims we rely on. My research is case-based, and focused on questions about the nature of evidence, ideals of objectivity, the role of values in science, and issues of accountability in science. I also publish on equity issues in philosophy and the sciences and, since moving to UBC in 2017, I’ve been exploring new lines of inquiry inspired by the UBC-based Indigenous/Science project.


Publications

Recent books

  • Evidential Reasoning in Archaeology, co-authored with Robert Chapman (Bloomsbury 2016). Website
  • Material Evidence: Learning from Archaeological Practice, co-edited with Robert Chapman (Routledge 2015).  Website

Recent articles

  • “Temporal Data that Travel: Radiocarbon Dating in Archaeology,” in Varieties of Data Journeys, eds. Leonelli & Tempini, Springer (in press).
  • “Crossing a Threshold: Collaborative Archaeology in Global Dialogue,” Archaeologies 15.5 (2019): 570-587. Preprint
  • Rock, Bone and Ruin: A Trace-centric Appreciation”: Theory and Practice in Biology 11 (2019).
  • 2017 Dewey Lecture: “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology” APA Proceedings and Addresses 91 (2017): 118-136.
  • “Representational and Experimental Modeling in Archaeology”: Springer Handbook of Model-based Science, eds. Magnani &  Bertolotti, 2017, pp. 989-1002.
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Standpoint Theory and the Formation of Gender Archaeology,” Scientiae Studia 15.1 (2017): 13-38.
  • “A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology”: in Objectivity in Science, eds. Padovani,  Richardson & Tsou, Springer (2015).
  • 2012 APA Presidential Address: “Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters" APA Proceedings and Addresses 86.2: 47-76.
  • “The Promise and Perils of an Ethic of Stewardship,” Embedding Ethics, eds. Meskell and  Pells (Berg 2005).

Awards

  • Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of the Social and Historical Sciences, Tier 1
  • Australian Academy of the Humanities, Corresponding Fellow
  • 2013 Distinguished Woman Philosopher of the Year, Society for Women in Philosophy
  • 2008 Patty Jo Watson Distinguished Lecturer, Archaeology Division, American Anthropological Association
  • 1995 Presidential Award, Society for American Archaeology, for contributions to the Committee for Ethics in Archaeology

Recent presentations

  • “Witnessing and Translating: The Indigenous/Science Project”:  2019 Saunders Lecture, Australasian Association of Philosophy (July 2019): ABC Radio podcast
  • “The Philosophy Exception: The Costs of Exclusion”: conference keynote, Excellence and Gender Equality (Australian National University, June 2019).
  • “Radiocarbon Dating and Robustness Reasoning in Archaeology”: Australasian Association of Philosophy keynote (July 2019); Annual University of Ohio Philosophy of Science Lecture (February 2019).
  • “Histories of Science in and for Practice: Turning Points in Archaeology”: Forum for History of the Human Sciences - Distinguished Lecture, History of Science Society (November 2018).
  • “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology”: 2017 Dewey Lecture, APA Pacific Division. Podcast & slides
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Why Feminism Matters to Archaeology and Philosophy,”Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture, University of Nottingham (October 2017), Katz Distinguished Lecture, University of Washington (May 2016). Video

Alison Wylie

Professor | Canada Research Chair | Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities
phone 604 822 6574
location_on Buchanan E 276
file_download Download CV

Ph.D. Philosophy Binghamton University 1982
B.A. Philosophy & Sociology, Mount Allison University 1976

My areas of specialization are philosophy of the social and historical sciences; feminist philosophy of science; history and philosophy of archaeology; ethics issues in the social sciences.

Most fundamentally I’m curious about how inquiry succeeds under non-ideal conditions, and how we can best adjudicate the knowledge claims we rely on. My research is case-based, and focused on questions about the nature of evidence, ideals of objectivity, the role of values in science, and issues of accountability in science. I also publish on equity issues in philosophy and the sciences and, since moving to UBC in 2017, I’ve been exploring new lines of inquiry inspired by the UBC-based Indigenous/Science project.

Recent books

  • Evidential Reasoning in Archaeology, co-authored with Robert Chapman (Bloomsbury 2016). Website
  • Material Evidence: Learning from Archaeological Practice, co-edited with Robert Chapman (Routledge 2015).  Website

Recent articles

  • “Temporal Data that Travel: Radiocarbon Dating in Archaeology,” in Varieties of Data Journeys, eds. Leonelli & Tempini, Springer (in press).
  • “Crossing a Threshold: Collaborative Archaeology in Global Dialogue,” Archaeologies 15.5 (2019): 570-587. Preprint
  • Rock, Bone and Ruin: A Trace-centric Appreciation”: Theory and Practice in Biology 11 (2019).
  • 2017 Dewey Lecture: “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology” APA Proceedings and Addresses 91 (2017): 118-136.
  • “Representational and Experimental Modeling in Archaeology”: Springer Handbook of Model-based Science, eds. Magnani &  Bertolotti, 2017, pp. 989-1002.
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Standpoint Theory and the Formation of Gender Archaeology,” Scientiae Studia 15.1 (2017): 13-38.
  • “A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology”: in Objectivity in Science, eds. Padovani,  Richardson & Tsou, Springer (2015).
  • 2012 APA Presidential Address: “Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters" APA Proceedings and Addresses 86.2: 47-76.
  • “The Promise and Perils of an Ethic of Stewardship,” Embedding Ethics, eds. Meskell and  Pells (Berg 2005).
  • Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of the Social and Historical Sciences, Tier 1
  • Australian Academy of the Humanities, Corresponding Fellow
  • 2013 Distinguished Woman Philosopher of the Year, Society for Women in Philosophy
  • 2008 Patty Jo Watson Distinguished Lecturer, Archaeology Division, American Anthropological Association
  • 1995 Presidential Award, Society for American Archaeology, for contributions to the Committee for Ethics in Archaeology
  • “Witnessing and Translating: The Indigenous/Science Project”:  2019 Saunders Lecture, Australasian Association of Philosophy (July 2019): ABC Radio podcast
  • “The Philosophy Exception: The Costs of Exclusion”: conference keynote, Excellence and Gender Equality (Australian National University, June 2019).
  • “Radiocarbon Dating and Robustness Reasoning in Archaeology”: Australasian Association of Philosophy keynote (July 2019); Annual University of Ohio Philosophy of Science Lecture (February 2019).
  • “Histories of Science in and for Practice: Turning Points in Archaeology”: Forum for History of the Human Sciences - Distinguished Lecture, History of Science Society (November 2018).
  • “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology”: 2017 Dewey Lecture, APA Pacific Division. Podcast & slides
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Why Feminism Matters to Archaeology and Philosophy,”Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture, University of Nottingham (October 2017), Katz Distinguished Lecture, University of Washington (May 2016). Video

Alison Wylie

Professor | Canada Research Chair | Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities
phone 604 822 6574
location_on Buchanan E 276
file_download Download CV

Ph.D. Philosophy Binghamton University 1982
B.A. Philosophy & Sociology, Mount Allison University 1976

My areas of specialization are philosophy of the social and historical sciences; feminist philosophy of science; history and philosophy of archaeology; ethics issues in the social sciences.

Most fundamentally I’m curious about how inquiry succeeds under non-ideal conditions, and how we can best adjudicate the knowledge claims we rely on. My research is case-based, and focused on questions about the nature of evidence, ideals of objectivity, the role of values in science, and issues of accountability in science. I also publish on equity issues in philosophy and the sciences and, since moving to UBC in 2017, I’ve been exploring new lines of inquiry inspired by the UBC-based Indigenous/Science project.

Recent books

  • Evidential Reasoning in Archaeology, co-authored with Robert Chapman (Bloomsbury 2016). Website
  • Material Evidence: Learning from Archaeological Practice, co-edited with Robert Chapman (Routledge 2015).  Website

Recent articles

  • “Temporal Data that Travel: Radiocarbon Dating in Archaeology,” in Varieties of Data Journeys, eds. Leonelli & Tempini, Springer (in press).
  • “Crossing a Threshold: Collaborative Archaeology in Global Dialogue,” Archaeologies 15.5 (2019): 570-587. Preprint
  • Rock, Bone and Ruin: A Trace-centric Appreciation”: Theory and Practice in Biology 11 (2019).
  • 2017 Dewey Lecture: “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology” APA Proceedings and Addresses 91 (2017): 118-136.
  • “Representational and Experimental Modeling in Archaeology”: Springer Handbook of Model-based Science, eds. Magnani &  Bertolotti, 2017, pp. 989-1002.
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Standpoint Theory and the Formation of Gender Archaeology,” Scientiae Studia 15.1 (2017): 13-38.
  • “A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology”: in Objectivity in Science, eds. Padovani,  Richardson & Tsou, Springer (2015).
  • 2012 APA Presidential Address: “Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters" APA Proceedings and Addresses 86.2: 47-76.
  • “The Promise and Perils of an Ethic of Stewardship,” Embedding Ethics, eds. Meskell and  Pells (Berg 2005).
  • Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of the Social and Historical Sciences, Tier 1
  • Australian Academy of the Humanities, Corresponding Fellow
  • 2013 Distinguished Woman Philosopher of the Year, Society for Women in Philosophy
  • 2008 Patty Jo Watson Distinguished Lecturer, Archaeology Division, American Anthropological Association
  • 1995 Presidential Award, Society for American Archaeology, for contributions to the Committee for Ethics in Archaeology
  • “Witnessing and Translating: The Indigenous/Science Project”:  2019 Saunders Lecture, Australasian Association of Philosophy (July 2019): ABC Radio podcast
  • “The Philosophy Exception: The Costs of Exclusion”: conference keynote, Excellence and Gender Equality (Australian National University, June 2019).
  • “Radiocarbon Dating and Robustness Reasoning in Archaeology”: Australasian Association of Philosophy keynote (July 2019); Annual University of Ohio Philosophy of Science Lecture (February 2019).
  • “Histories of Science in and for Practice: Turning Points in Archaeology”: Forum for History of the Human Sciences - Distinguished Lecture, History of Science Society (November 2018).
  • “From the Ground Up: Philosophy and Archaeology”: 2017 Dewey Lecture, APA Pacific Division. Podcast & slides
  • “What Knowers Know Well: Why Feminism Matters to Archaeology and Philosophy,”Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture, University of Nottingham (October 2017), Katz Distinguished Lecture, University of Washington (May 2016). Video