Dominic Alford-Duguid

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E362
Research Areas
Education

Ph.D., University of Toronto


About

Office Hours – 2022W term 2

  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 2pm to 3pm
  • On leave 2022W term 1

 

 


Teaching


Research

Among the other things it allows us to do, perception permits us to think about the observable properties of objects (e.g. their colour, their shape, their size, etc.). One strand of my research investigates what this fact should lead us to say about perception and thought. In addition, I write about nearby issues in philosophy of mind, epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language. I am particularly interested in debates about reference, quantification, communication, and the rational significance of perceptual experience.

I also have a strong sideline in philosophy of law. My forays into legal theory began with the foundations of general jurisprudence, but now also encompass questions about the relationship between privacy and control.


Publications

  • ‘Russell on Propositions’ (2022) Routledge Handbook of Propositions (eds. A. Murray and C. Tillman). [w/Fatema Amijee]
  • ‘Thinking Through Illusion’ (2020) European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3): 617-638.
  • ‘Thought about Properties: Why the Perceptual Case is Basic’ (2018) Philosophical Quarterly 68 (271): 221-242.
  • ‘On the Explanatory Power of Hallucination’ (2017) Synthèse 194: 1765-1785. [w/ M. Arsenault]

Dominic Alford-Duguid

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E362
Research Areas
Education

Ph.D., University of Toronto


About

Office Hours – 2022W term 2

  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 2pm to 3pm
  • On leave 2022W term 1

 

 


Teaching


Research

Among the other things it allows us to do, perception permits us to think about the observable properties of objects (e.g. their colour, their shape, their size, etc.). One strand of my research investigates what this fact should lead us to say about perception and thought. In addition, I write about nearby issues in philosophy of mind, epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language. I am particularly interested in debates about reference, quantification, communication, and the rational significance of perceptual experience.

I also have a strong sideline in philosophy of law. My forays into legal theory began with the foundations of general jurisprudence, but now also encompass questions about the relationship between privacy and control.


Publications

  • ‘Russell on Propositions’ (2022) Routledge Handbook of Propositions (eds. A. Murray and C. Tillman). [w/Fatema Amijee]
  • ‘Thinking Through Illusion’ (2020) European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3): 617-638.
  • ‘Thought about Properties: Why the Perceptual Case is Basic’ (2018) Philosophical Quarterly 68 (271): 221-242.
  • ‘On the Explanatory Power of Hallucination’ (2017) Synthèse 194: 1765-1785. [w/ M. Arsenault]

Dominic Alford-Duguid

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E362
Research Areas
Education

Ph.D., University of Toronto

Office Hours - 2022W term 2

  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 2pm to 3pm
  • On leave 2022W term 1

 

 

Among the other things it allows us to do, perception permits us to think about the observable properties of objects (e.g. their colour, their shape, their size, etc.). One strand of my research investigates what this fact should lead us to say about perception and thought. In addition, I write about nearby issues in philosophy of mind, epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language. I am particularly interested in debates about reference, quantification, communication, and the rational significance of perceptual experience.

I also have a strong sideline in philosophy of law. My forays into legal theory began with the foundations of general jurisprudence, but now also encompass questions about the relationship between privacy and control.

  • 'Russell on Propositions' (2022) Routledge Handbook of Propositions (eds. A. Murray and C. Tillman). [w/Fatema Amijee]
  • 'Thinking Through Illusion' (2020) European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3): 617-638.
  • 'Thought about Properties: Why the Perceptual Case is Basic' (2018) Philosophical Quarterly 68 (271): 221-242.
  • 'On the Explanatory Power of Hallucination' (2017) Synthèse 194: 1765-1785. [w/ M. Arsenault]