Fatema Amijee

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E369 - 1866 Main Mall

Research Area

Education

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

About

Office Hours – 2020W1:

  • Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00 PM
  • Also available by appointment (fatema.amijee@ubc.ca)

Research

A primary focus of my work is the Principle of Sufficient Reason (roughly: ‘Everything has an explanation’). The principle was a prime tenet of early modern rationalism, and thus much of my work in the history of early modern philosophy concerns metaphysical themes in Leibniz, Spinoza, Du Châtelet, and other early modern rationalists. I also spend a lot of my time thinking about the Principle of Sufficient Reason as a thesis within contemporary metaphysics. Questions I have investigated include: How should we understand the PSR, in light of recent developments in metaphysics? What is the best argument for the principle? And is a commitment to the PSR consistent with a commitment to a fundamental level of reality?

In addition to early modern rationalism and metaphysics, I write on topics in feminist philosophy, including depatriarchalizing strategies in Quranic interpretation, and the history of analytic philosophy (especially Russell’s theory of knowledge).


Fatema Amijee

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E369 - 1866 Main Mall

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Office Hours - 2020W1:

  • Wednesdays, 2:00 - 4:00 PM
  • Also available by appointment (fatema.amijee@ubc.ca)

A primary focus of my work is the Principle of Sufficient Reason (roughly: 'Everything has an explanation'). The principle was a prime tenet of early modern rationalism, and thus much of my work in the history of early modern philosophy concerns metaphysical themes in Leibniz, Spinoza, Du Châtelet, and other early modern rationalists. I also spend a lot of my time thinking about the Principle of Sufficient Reason as a thesis within contemporary metaphysics. Questions I have investigated include: How should we understand the PSR, in light of recent developments in metaphysics? What is the best argument for the principle? And is a commitment to the PSR consistent with a commitment to a fundamental level of reality?

In addition to early modern rationalism and metaphysics, I write on topics in feminist philosophy, including depatriarchalizing strategies in Quranic interpretation, and the history of analytic philosophy (especially Russell's theory of knowledge).

Fatema Amijee

Assistant Professor
location_on BUCH E369 - 1866 Main Mall

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Office Hours - 2020W1:

  • Wednesdays, 2:00 - 4:00 PM
  • Also available by appointment (fatema.amijee@ubc.ca)

A primary focus of my work is the Principle of Sufficient Reason (roughly: 'Everything has an explanation'). The principle was a prime tenet of early modern rationalism, and thus much of my work in the history of early modern philosophy concerns metaphysical themes in Leibniz, Spinoza, Du Châtelet, and other early modern rationalists. I also spend a lot of my time thinking about the Principle of Sufficient Reason as a thesis within contemporary metaphysics. Questions I have investigated include: How should we understand the PSR, in light of recent developments in metaphysics? What is the best argument for the principle? And is a commitment to the PSR consistent with a commitment to a fundamental level of reality?

In addition to early modern rationalism and metaphysics, I write on topics in feminist philosophy, including depatriarchalizing strategies in Quranic interpretation, and the history of analytic philosophy (especially Russell's theory of knowledge).